Colorious Weaving

These are some of my weaving samples from over the last 30 years. I have always been more of a Textile Experimenter (Experimentalist?  Experimentician?) than a Textile Expert.  Magazine articles and workshops constantly introduced… Continue reading

And Now for the Range Part

About 3 years ago, I got to move to the Piney Woods of Texas, to a small farm that has been in my husband’s family for 50 years.  I was surprised at how many people… Continue reading

Texas Quilt Museum

Last week my weaving friend Susan and I took a day trip to the new Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange. We made a couple of stops along the way – first to… Continue reading

Happy Textiles 2

This vintage table cloth captures the spirit of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.  Doesn’t it make you feel like gathering the community for a quick barn-raising, followed by a potluck feast? The tablecloth… Continue reading

What’s Your Textile Identity?

“If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be?”  We hear that kind of question in election years, directed at the candidates.  It’s interesting to hear the answers, but the… Continue reading

Happy Feet

I’d always assumed these stockings were hand knit, just because they were made of cotton and had fancy stitches.  But since reading the 1914 book Textiles by William H. Dooley, I think they may… Continue reading

Umbrella Etiquette, 1922-style

After a year-long drought, we are getting days and days of rain.  Of course one’s first thought on getting caught in a rainstorm is, “How do I protect my clothing?  And more importantly,… Continue reading

Happy Textiles 1

Textile Destinations – Washington, Texas

Over the weekend my husband and I took advantage of the mild winter weather to do a little sight-seeing.  We went to a nearby state park, Washington-on-the-Brazos.  Not only was the Texas Declaration of Independence signed… Continue reading

Edith Head

February is Oscars Month. While I don’t keep up with current movies (meaning, any movies after 1950), I do love the old movies from the 30s and 40s,  and the cold, rainy days of… Continue reading